Glory .com : #UDRP against 1995 #domain name was denied at the #WIPO

Glory Ltd. of Himeji, Japan, filed a UDRP against the aged domain Glory.com. Registered in 1995, Glory.com has been in the current registrant’s possession for 14 years. According to the documents of this UDRP, the Respondent paid $115,000 dollars to acquire Glory.com in 2003. It sought $10 million USD from the Complainant, when they inquired about it. The Complainant operates from the domain Glory-Global.com. Surprisingly, the three member panel at the WIPO gave two out of 3 points to the Complainant: the domain infringes on the GLORY mark, and that the Respondent does not have “legitimate interests” in the domain. The third and crucial element of the dispute went to the Respondent, however; they did not acquire the domain, nor used it in bad faith. The three member panel ordered Glory.com to remain with the Respondent.

Coca-Cola accused of bullying UK coffee shop owners

Coca-Cola is facing accusations of being a “trademark bully” after reportedly asking an independent coffee shop in a UK town to stop using the word ‘Honest’. Wyatt Cavalier and his wife Grace, who have run Honest Coffees since 2013, were told to change the name by Coca-Cola. couple received a letter from lawyers working for Coca-Cola saying the names Honest Coffees and a new offshoot Honest Milk are too similar to that of Coca-Cola’s subsidiary Honest Tea. The letter ordered them to change the name or face court action. It went on to question how Coca-Cola can trademark the term ‘Honest’, given that “there are loads of companies with ‘Honest’ in their name”..

Radiohead reportedly suing Lana Del Rey copyright infringement

The singer denies her song 'Get Free' was inspired by 'Creep' Lana Del Rey has responded to reports that she is being sued by Radiohead for copyright infringement. This weekend, it was alleged that the ‘Born To Die’ singer was accused of copying elements of their 1993 hit ‘Creep’ on her ‘Lust For Life’ album track ‘Get Free’. It’s the final song on the number one record, which also includes the single ‘Love’. Both teams are trying to thrash it out behind the scenes to prevent it going to court.









Did the US Navy plunder this Cape Cod jeweler’s trademark?

It might seem like a bad idea to get into a fight with an adversary that has battleships and fighter jets at its disposal. But that isn’t stopping Alyson Pacini. Pacini, co-owner of a small jewelry shop on Cape Cod, isn’t backing down after the US Navy launched a new recruiting campaign with the slogan “Forged by the Sea” — a tagline she’s been using since 2011 and trademarked five years later. “I feel very much taken advantage of right now,” said Pacini, whose company slogan was inspired by her use of sea glass, pearls, and other nautical motifs to make hammered necklaces and bracelets.


Facebook, Instagram Removed 3 Million Infringing Posts During First Half of 2017

Facebook, Inc. removed nearly 3 million posts, including videos, ads and other forms of content, from its sites during the first half of 2017 in response to takedown complaints over counterfeiting, and trademark and copyright infringement. The San Francisco-based social media giant, which owns Facebook and Instagram, announced the intellectual property-related takedown data by way of its “Transparency Report.” As Chris Sonderby, a deputy general counsel for Facebook, Inc., stated on Monday, “We believe that sharing information about (intellectual property) reports we receive from rights holders is an important step toward being more open and clear about how we protect the people and businesses that use our services.”

Football minnows in Wembley logo battle

It is the sort of David versus Goliath tussle that would electrify the third round of the FA Cup — a bitter legal dispute has broken out between the home of English football and a tiny north London club. Wembley FC, which has a gas fitter, lorry driver and solicitor in its team, has been told by the EU’s Intellectual Property Office that it must give up the trademark registered for its club logo. The ruling comes after a complaint by Wembley stadium, which is owned by the Football Association (FA), governing body of the game in England. The stadium has a capacity of 90,000, a far cry from Wembley FC’s ground at Vale Farm with its capacity of 2,450. In 2012 the club registered.